Collins Ryàn - L'artiste (New Zealand)

worked on shots taken by -

Alireza Vafa (Iran)

Through Lightroom CC--2.jpg
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Stardust Shadow

Shot: Alireza Vafa.

Edited: Collins Ryan

We are all just materials. We are nothing but the same materials that build the whole Universe. The stardust that creates rocks, then mountains then the whole planet, from which we emerged as living creatures.

Alireza Vafa is a great Astrophotographer which I personally adore. I worked on this challenging shot of Alireza from four different exposures. I decided to create and accentuate a linear view right from the top of the frame towards the half-crescent shape that the bright clouds create there just over the rocky hills of this landscape in Iran, Alireza's home country.

With their rounded shape, I wanted to deem those clouds as a tool, like a bowl that gets all the falling stars onto it. The star trails that show up at the edges of the sky become tinier and dotty where they are closer to the bowl, letting the viewer get some deeper point of view regarding the immense size of our universe.

I worked on the rugged rocks that are laid on the seashore but chose to darken them so they can genuinely impact the beholder that despite their size and character they are merely the shadow of much bigger entity

Shot with Tokina opera 16-28mm f/2.8

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500 Rule

Shot: Alireza Vafa.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Back in the day, there were photographers that used only film in order to create their work. During the film era, we used to use what is called "The 500 Rule". That, in simple words, described the method that those past time photographers calculated what shutter speed they needed to shoot in order to get sharp/er, dotty stars, as opposed to star-trails.

These days we live in a totally different era. The digital cameras are in the hands of 99% of the photographers around the world. However, for me, the "500" means now some peaceful meaning. Peaceful as this reflects the relaxing 500nm wavelength of  the cyan shade that we see up in the sky during the sunset moments.

 

This wonderful piece is simply brilliant in how the rugged, rough rocks get no real character when the peaceful time of the day kicks in. Such a great Black & White idea in such a strong shot!

Ryan editing to Alireza  01.jpg

Shot with Tokina opera 16-28mm f/2.8

Ryan's editing on Alireza's frame15-June
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Ion or Or-ion

Shot: Alireza Vafa.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Cleverly shot using 5 different exposures using the wonderful Tokina opera 50mm lens, the Orion Nebula is clearly seen.

Orion is beautiful and I reckon that it is one of the most recognized constellations up there in the night sky.

Dust and gases, ions and physics forces create this brilliant scene. Orion is, as far as I am aware of, not a star, not a stellar system, but is a nursery. A nursery that creates new stars in it.

Shot with Tokina opera 50mm f/1.4

Shot while mounted on the Kenko "Skymemo S" equatorial mount

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Upside Down

Shot: Alireza Vafa

Edited: Collins Ryan

This is where I reckon that the creator of this wonderful shot did not really think where I would lead the work in!
 

In photography, they try to teach new photographers to go in a specific way, specific rules, specific system of perspective. I think I'd rather go in different ways.

People know me as a "rule-breaker - rule maker" and I cannot say that they are wrong in their assumptions. When I first saw those four exposures that Alireza has given me, I immediately knew that this is for me more of a landscape photo than an Astro work!

I have let my imagination to run freely and I saw elephants, lion, zebras and Hypopothamuses in there. Yes, look at the lake at this peaceful hour of the night. All are standing still, the stars are reflected through the water and the air is pure as the silence.

Those trees obscure the night predators that now are just waiting to have the first opportunity to hunt their next meal. The peaceful atmosphere is only a fake; it is all just the opposite. All is just upside down. Like the stars, like the sky, like everything. A moment in time out there in a far away land.

Ryan's editing on Alireza's frame 2

Shot with Tokina opera 50mm f/1.4

Ryan editing to Alireza  03.jpg

Shot with Tokina opera 50mm f/1.4

Alireza Vafa, self-portrait

Edited: Collins Ryàn - L'artiste

Alireza is a nice guy from Iran. Having his career based around the Astronomy studies makes him one of the most reliable persons and photographers when you refer to the night sky and the objects that are just up above us.

I could not imagine working on this shot without connecting Alireza to the passion he has to the dark sky. So, indeed, that could stay as a day time shot as it was initially given to me by him. However, as the night time forces our eyes to use the Rods and by that to lose the ability to view colours, I decided that stripping the colours is the best way to represent the person better.

I am certain that all of you have seen the Milky-Way in photos, at least once. Stripping the shot from its colours allowed me to illustrate better the Idea. That smiling fellow out there feels so comfortable while he sits on a long rock that if you use your imagination, you may view the similarity of the rock to the stars that are scattered in the Milky-Way. Some brighter patches of light, some darker parts, and all in a long stretching amorphic shape.