Collins Ryàn - L'artiste (New Zealand)

worked on shots taken by -

Wim van de Water (The Netherlands)

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Upbringing

Shot: Wim van de Water.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Collins writes:

This is just amazing to think about it: we live, we die, and then from all the sorrow and pain we combat the moments and get stronger, with some different methods to tackle issues.

Just like in nature. It lives. It dies, and then the nature finds its right circle of actions to overcome, to build from the start.Look at the musgrooms, they know exactly what I talk about. They grow from total dark to be a beautiful, resilient living structures.

Shot with Tokina AT-X PRO D Macro 100mm f/2.8

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Peaceful Mill

Shot: Wim van de Water.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Collins writes:

Europe seems to me, from our position here in Paradise (New Zealand) at the the Southern Hemisphere, as a different world. Well, if not a different world, then at least half a world away. This is true, by the way...

The lush lands of Holland remind me the lsuh fields stretching in our magical islands over here. So many similarities between the countries. The one eye catching similarity is the extreme quieteness and the sense of freedom wherever you find yourself in the countryside.

This shot of Wim cannot transfer anything else but a pure tranquility.

I intentionally left the frame uncropped. I could cut it from the leftin order to focus your attention to the windmills and the quiet river. But I see that little bridge there as a meaningful part of the entire idea. The bridge symbolize the direct transfer from peaceful moments in our lives to more exciting and fast-paced experience.

 

Same thing like when you see the calm river and countryside on most of the frame and then that small part on the left that reminds you that there is still entirely different environment on the other side!

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Shot through Hoya HDx filter

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Respect

Shot: Wim van de Water.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Collins writes:

I remember visiting in The Netherlands a few times in my life. The beautiful flat country has always showed fantastic colours of flowers.

 

There was a nice market out there in Amsterdam. I noticed a lot of respect to people of different colours and admired the culture that this small country lives in.

The acceptance to me was as natural as seeing different flowers growing next to one another. Some of them, like us Humans, are soft and the others are more spiky and rough.

Still - bind together in a mixed match of respect.

I decided to strip away the colours from this frame of Wim. As I come from a baseline of Black & White art, in my art I intend to let the subjects in the frame to "talk", and be more dramatic, rather than letting the eyes to wander around until they find the Hero subject.

I focus here on the combination of different kinds and the harmony they create, just like we - Humans - need to create in our societies!

Shot with Tokina AT-X PRO 16-28mm f/2.8

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Three Whites

Shot: Wim van de Water.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Collins writes:

When I viewed the shot for the first time I saw people standing there. I could not see those valves. Only people.

Having watched some great drama movies very recently planted in my brain a lot of thoughts. I refer to the time where social statuses were related to the colour of one's skin, their place of birth and the like. Those very unfortunate times seemed to pass away from this world; yet, they only allegedly passed away.

I feel the pain. The sorrow. The anger. The inability to fight prejudice and racism.

In this frame I saw people. I saw three white people standing in front of their counterparts of different shades. Those three are in the spot light, are in the forefront, I wanted to make a point here, that after all, that does not really matter what colour you are - because you are equal to others, the same way that when you see that picture for the first time!

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Shot with Tokina AT-X PRO 16-28mm f/2.8

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Vacuum

Shot: Wim van de Water.

Edited: Collins Ryan

Collins writes:

The original shot shows a beautiful deserted hall. The wide lens that it was taken with made a great justice to it. Leaving no one to guess that this venue had some better, vibrant days. 

 

As an artist the thing that captured me the most was the stylized floor. The large layer  of mosaic took about 1/3 of the frame and I felt that I was simply being vacuuming by it onto the doors at the end of it. Everything seems so flowing, so rounded, and in my minds I wandered on such a slippery, shaky, irresistible surface. A sort of the same feeling when Alice could not resist the falling to the Neverland.

The doors have rounded shape at their top and the waves iteration genuinely completed the whole story. I now felt like I am Alice, actually.

I decided to use some non related lens "correction"

Shot with Tokina AT-X PRO 16-28mm f/2.8

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Shot with Tokina opera 16-28mm f/2.8

Wim van de Water,  self-portrait

Artwork: Collins Ryàn - L'artiste

Collins writes:

This is Wim. As I planned this project, I asked that each one of us would also shoot and deliver an unedited self portrait to the other two photographers. I come from the B&W and dramatic baseline and developed my fine-art in such way that I combine my B&W ideas onto the colour ones.

I was very happy to see Wim sitting next to the piano. Piano and violins are my favorite dramatic musical instruments. I was very connected to the staged scene that he created in the abandoned building. I saw the Mad Hatter's hat on his head and immediately it flickered in my brain that this scene must show two different pespectives in the same person. Have I already said that I come from the dramatic niche?!
 

The Mad Hatter loves to be in the spotlight. But it is dark, and sad inside. He feels alone but still prefers to show-off his performing abilities. He doesn't need glasses, but for some reason wears on, and I mean - he wears only ONE glass for ONE eye.
Everything here is divided in two. Everything has a different view.